Perennial IT Memory Loss

There is a strange thing happening in corporate IT functions; a recurring phenomenon that makes the IT organization lose its memory. I’m not talking about a total amnesia, but rather a selective one afflicting corporate IT’s ability to deal with the current state of the technical assets it manages. This condition becomes especially acute at the very beginning of a project focussed on implementing technical changes to drive business evolution. Here’s how it happens:

It all starts with project-orientation. As we discussed in another article, the management of major changes in your internal IT organization is probably project oriented. Projects are a proven conduit for delivering change. Thanks to current education and industry certification standards of practice, managed projects are undoubtedly the way to go to ensure that your IT investment dollars and the resulting outputs are tightly governed. Unfortunately, things start to slip when project management practices become so entrenched that they overshadow all other types of sound management, until the whole IT machine surrenders to project-orientation.

The Constraints of Project Scope

As you may know, by definition, and as taught to hundreds of thousands of project managers (PMs) worldwide, a project is a temporary endeavor. It has a start date and an end date. Circumstantially, what happens before kickoff and after closure is not part of the project.

The scope of the project therefore excludes any activity leading to the current state of your IT portfolio. The strengths or limitations of the foundational technical components that serve as the base matter from which business changes are initiated are considered project planning inputs. The estimation of the work effort to change current assets, or the identification and quantification of risks associated with the state of the IT portfolio, will always be considered nothing more than project planning and project risk management.

Further excluded from project management are considerations that will apply after the project finish date. These factors encompass effects on future projects or consequences for the flexibility of platforms in face of subsequent changes. Quality assessments are common project related activities, likely applied as part of a quality management plan. But a project being a project, any quality criteria with impact exclusively beyond the project boundaries will have less weight than those within a project’s scope – and by a significant margin. Procedures directly influencing project performance – that is, being on-time and on-budget (OTOB)– will be treated with diligence. All other desired qualities, especially those that have little to do with what is delivered within the current project, become second-class citizens.

Any task to control a quality criterion that does not help achieving project objectives (OTOB) becomes a project charge like any other one, and an easy target for cost avoidance.

This ranking is more than obvious when a project is pressured by stakeholder timelines or in cases of shortages of all sorts become manifest. Keep in mind that the PM is neck-deep into managing a project, not managing the whole technology assets lifecycle. Also remember that the PM has money for processes happening within the boundaries of the project. After the project crosses the finish line, the PM will work on another project, or may look for a new job or contract elsewhere.

When all changes are managed by a PM within a project, with little counter-weight from any other of type of management, corporate IT surrenders to project-orientation.  When no effective cross-cutting process exists independently from project management prerogatives, your IT becomes project oriented.  I confidently suspect that your corporate IT suffers from this condition unless you already have made a shift to the new age of corporate IT.

Project Quality vs. Asset Quality

Project orientation has a very perverse effect on how technology is delivered: all radars are focussed on projects, with their start and end dates, and as such the whole machine becomes bounded by near term objectives. The short term project goals in turn directly impact quality objectives and the means put in place to ascertain compliance. Again, since quality control is project funded and managed, the controls that directly impact project performance will always be favored, especially when resources are scarce.

In project-oriented IT, quality criteria such as the ability of a built solution to sustain change, or the complexity of the resulting assets don’t stand a chance.

The result is patent: a web of complex, disjointed, heterogeneous, and convoluted IT components which become a burden to future projects.

It’s here that the amnesia kicks in.

All IT Creations Are Acts of God

When the next project dependent on the previously created or updated components commences, everyone acts as if the state of these assets was just a fact of life.

Whatever the state of the assets in place, at the beginning of a new project, it’s as if some alien phenomena had put them place; as if they were the result of an uncontrollable godly force external to IT.

Everyone in IT has suddenly forgotten that the complexity, heterogeneity, inferior quality, inflexibility, and any other flaws come from their own decisions, made during the preceding projects.

This affliction, like the spring bloom of perennial plants, repeats itself continuously. At the vernal phase of IT projects, when positivism and hopes are high, everybody looks ahead; no one wants to take a critical look behind. This epidemic has nothing to do with skills or good faith, but can instead be traced to how accountabilities are assigned and the measurement of performance.

When all changes are subject to project-oriented IT management, the assets become accessory matter. Your corporate IT team delivers projects, not assets.

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